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Brigadier General George Burgwyn Anderson

Brigadier General George Burgwyn Anderson
Born April 12, 1831 at Hillsboro, NC
USMA 10th in 1852
Wounded at Malvern Hill
Mortally wounded September 17, 1862 at Antietam/Sharpsburg
Died October 16, 1862 at Raleigh, NC
Buried Oakwood Cemetery, Raleigh, NC

FATHER: William E. Anderson
MOTHER: Eliza Burgwn - daughter of George Burgwyn, of New Hanover
MARRIED: Mildred Ewing, of Louisville

BROTHER: Lieutenant Robert Walker Anderson
BROTHER: William. E. Anderson


Brigadier General George Burgwyn Anderson

 

Pre-War Profession Graduated West Point 1852, 2nd Dragoons, frontier duty
War Service April 1861 Col. of 4th North Carolina, Williamsburg, Brig. Gen. June 1862, commanded NC (formerly Featherstonís) Bde/D H Hill's division in Seven Days, Malvern Hill (w), South Mountain, Sharpsburg (w), died following an amputation.

General Geo. B. Anderson, (born April 12, 1831, died Oct. 16, 1862,) was the son of William E. Anderson, born near Hillsboro. His mother was Eliza, daughter of Geo. Burgwyn, of New Hanover. He married Nov. 8th, 1857, Miss Mildred Ewing, of Louisville.

His education was conducted by William Bingham, and at the Caldwell Institute, until 1848, when he was, on the recommendation of Hon. A. W. Venable, appointed a cadet at the United States Military Academy, where he graduated in 1852. He was then appointed Lieutenant of Dragoons. After spending six months in the Cavalry School, at Carlisle, he was appointed assistant to Lt. Parke of the Engineers and ordered to locate the route for a railroad to California. This duty performed, he joined his regiment in Texas, and marched over to Fort Riley, Kansas, where the troops were constantly engaged in arresting predatory parties, headed by Lane and Ossawatomie Brown, or Missouri mobs.

When the war of 1861 began he resigned his commission in the United States Army, and hastened to North Carolina to share the fortunes of his native State. He was the first officer of the old army who tendered his sword and services to North Carolina. He was appointed on May 18, 1861, by Gov. Ellis, colonel to the 4th Reg't, N. C. troops; John A. Young, of Charlotte, was the Lt. Col., and Bryan Grimes, of Pitt, Major. The Regiment after being organized at Garysburg, marched to the front. Though engaged in slight skirmishes at Williamsburg, the 4th Regiment did not receive its real baptism till May 31, in the bloody battle of Seven Pines. Here, in the absence of General Featherston, Colonel Anderson commanded a Brigade, consisting of the 49th Va., Col. (Ex-Gov.) Wm. Smith; 27th and 28th Georgia, and the 4th North Carolina. The latter went into this battle with 520 men and 27 officers. It lost 86 men killed, 376 wounded, and 24 officers. Such was the gallant bearing and skillful conduct of Colonel Anderson, that he received the highest encomiums from his commander, Gen. D. H. Hill, and was promoted on June the 9th to be a Brigadier-General, and the 2nd, 4th, 14th and 20th regiments of North Carolina troops were assigned as his brigade.

In the series of battles around Richmond the brigade earned an immortality of renown. At Malvern Hill, Gen. Anderson was wounded in the hand. At the battle of Sharpsburg, Sept. 17th, he occupied a prominent position on slightly rising ground. While thus exposed he was struck by a minnie ball near the ankle joint and fell. He was carried with difficulty and danger to the rear, and subsequently across the Potomac to Sheperdstown. Accompanied by his brother, Lieutenant Robert Walker Anderson, who was afterwards killed, May 5th, 1864, in the Wilderness, he was carried in a wagon up the valley to Stanton, thence by rail to Raleigh. Here at the residence of his brother, Wm. E. Anderson, he received every attention that science and affection could offer. After a fortnight of intense suffering, mortification set in, and amputation was resorted to, as the last hope, but he sank under the operation. On the 16th of Oct. 1862, his pure and noble spirit departed for another and better world.

He was buried in the city cemetery with obsequies suitable to his gallant conduct, and his heroic death.

    Source: Wheeler's Reminiscences

Units Which Served under Gen. Anderson:

    Battle of Seven Pines - May 11, 1862
      49th Virginia Infantry Regiment
      27th Georgia Infantry Regiment
      28th Georgia Infantry Regiment
      4th North Carolina Infantry Regiment

    June 9, 1862 - Sept. 17, 1862

      2nd North Carolina Infantry Regiment
      4th North Carolina Infantry Regiment
      14th North Carolina Infantry Regiment
      20th North Carolina Infantry Regiment

For Further Research
Hill, Daniel H.
- Confederate Military History - North Carolina Volume
2 vols. Hardback
863 pgs.
$90.00
CD-ROM
$15.00
Wheeler,
Wheeler's Reminiscences
Paperback
65.00
CD-ROM
$15.00
Rigdon, John C.
- Historical Sketch and Roster of the Georgia 27th Infantry Regiment
Ebook
$12.95

Paperback
$19.95
CD-ROM
$15.00
Rigdon, John C.
- Historical Sketch and Roster of the Georgia 28th Infantry Regiment
Ebook
$12.95

Paperback
$19.95
CD-ROM
$15.00
Rigdon, John C.
- Historical Sketch and Roster of the North Carolina 4th Infantry Regiment
Hardback
$29.95

Paperback
$19.95
CD-ROM
$15.00
Rigdon, John C.
- Historical Sketch and Roster of the North Carolina 14th Infantry Regiment
Hardback
$29.95

Paperback
$19.95
CD-ROM
$15.00
Rigdon, John C.
- Historical Sketch and Roster of the North Carolina 20th Infantry Regiment
Hardback
$29.95

Paperback
$19.95
CD-ROM
$15.00
Rigdon, John C.
The Civil War in North Carolina
 
CD-ROM
$35.00
Rigdon, John C.
North Carolina Civil War Soldiers Index
 
CD-ROM
$12.00
Confederate Generals
 
CD-ROM
$35.00


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